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No Plaice For Racism In Fishing

There’s no plaice for racism in our sport.

A fishery owner has put up this sign at his fishery — I didn’t realise we were still living in the 1930’s – very sad to see such blatant racism.

No Polish Or Eastern Europeans Allowed

No Polish Or Eastern Europeans Allowed

Also very sad to see – in fact disgusting to see – that the Police don’t think that its any of their business to prevent this sort of thing from happening, as they told the complainant to go to the Equality And Human Rights Commission – who also refused to take this case forwards….

So the complainant (A respected UK based Polish Angler) has decided to take out a private prosecution.

You can read more about this case here via this link 

Salford Friendly Anglers Society have pledged £200 to support this threat of court action – we urge you to make a pledge to help too  – there’s no place for racism among the brothers and sisters of the angle.

Remember this blast from the past ? There’s no difference.

no-dogs-no-blacks-no-irish-sign

We apologise for the terrible Plaice pun – we couldn’t resist

 

 

A Historic Challenge From Broughton Angling Society Dated 1903

Back in 1903 it was commonplace for angling clubs to issue challenges to other local clubs..

We found this invitation to hold a fishing competition from Broughton Angling Society dated 1903 – challenging The Salford Friendly Anglers Society to a match.

I attended a Broughton Anglers Society meeting last night (the 5th Dec 2017) and showed their committee members this document – and informed them that we accept their challenge. Match to be held summer 2018 at Broughton Park Lake, Salford. I am looking forwards to them buying my tea!

Bring it on.

Here is a copy of the original challenge letter, with a deciphered version below.

Challenge Letter From Broughton Anglers 1903

Challenge Letter From Broughton Anglers 1903

Translated Copy of letter from Broughton Anglers 1903

Translated Copy of letter from Broughton Anglers 1903

 

River Irwell To Receive Major Fish Restocking

Great news today from the EA –  that a winter restocking is on the way for the River Irwell

10,000 roach, chub and dace are on order from the EAs fish farm at Calverton  and will be stocked in the Irwell at a variety of locations downstream of Burrs Country Park

This is great news for the river which has suffered terribly in recent years from a variety of pollution incidents and from massive amounts of avian predation

All of this has been paid for out of our rod licence money……. there really is no excuse not to buy one.

Theres also 500 of these beardey gudgeonish looking things.  There is only a small population in the Irwell – and a few more to grown on and reach breeding maturity can do no harm – can’t wait.

Once the date for restocking has been set – I will let people know so that they can come and witness the event and take a few photos.

6 inch barbel being stocked into the River Irwell at Salford Racecourse December 2011

6 inch barbel being stocked into the River Irwell at Salford Racecourse December 2011

 

Wallness Social Angling Society Spastics Effort 1962

Like many old angling clubs the long lived but now defunct Wallness Social Angling Society was based at the Wallness Tavern, Wallness Lane, Salford (less than 200 yards away from the current Salford Friendly Anglers HQ).

The Wallness Social Angling Society featured regularly in local angling club matches and are mentioned in many of our clubs historical documents. Sadly the pub was demolished in 2012.

As we have been digitising our Societies records we came accros this amazing poster of a fishing match which the Wallness Social Angling Society organised in 1962 on the Macclesfield Canal at Higher Poynton – a charity match in aid of the Manchester and District Spastics Society.

Macclesfield Canal Angling Championship 1962 Poster

Macclesfield Canal Angling Championship 1962 Poster

The Spastics Society still exists under its current guise of the charity Scope.

The County Palatine Angling Association amalgamated/morphed into the Northern Anglers Association during the early 1970s – and N.A.A. still own the fishing rights on the Macclesfield Canal between Marple and Macclesfield.

However the canal at Higher Poynton is no longer suitable for match fishing as it is extensively used for the mooring of narrowboats.

As we searched through our records – we also came across the financial breakdown of the match, the list of angling clubs and individuals who took part in the match, and the companies who sponsored the prizes. A great find.

Financial record of the Macclesfield Canal Angling Championship 1962

Financial record of the Macclesfield Canal Angling Championship 1962

The match raised a total of £173 for the Manchester and District Spastics Society  – a fantastic effort seeing as though that translates to £3,580 in todays money taking into account inflation.  The £5 winning prize money is now worth £100 in todays money.

This is an amazing record of North West Angling Clubs in 1962  – sadly many of them no longer exist, nor do any of the tackle shops listed who contributed to the prize fund.

Canal Championship Matches used to be quite commonplace in the North West until the mid 1980s….. I can remember taking part in a number of Rochdale Canal Angling Championships (sponsored by the Manchester Evening News and their Angling correspondent Don Bridgewater)  – it could be a bit of fun reviving it.

 

 

 

The Freshwater Fish Preservation League

A meeting was held at the Swan Hotel, Fountain St, Manchester on the 11th November 1908 between committee members of The Salford Friendly Anglers Society, The County Palatine Angling Association and the Moss Side Social Angling Club with the remit of setting up a group of local angling associations dedicated to improving our sport by

1. Observing the close seasons.

2. To stop the taking of undersized fish for the table

3. To halt the practice of killing all fish before the weigh in at angling competitions.

4. To encourage all anglers to become “good sportsmen”

Long before the days when catch and release was the norm – most fish caught ended up as someones dinner.

At the turn of the 19th century it was common practice for match nets to be weighed in dead, and the fish sold by the fishing club match organising committee.

Obviously some enlightened anglers were wise to the fact that practices such as this were damaging our sport and decided to take appropriate action.

The meeting resulted in the formation of the Freshwater Fish Preservation League – who continued as an active organisation until the late 1950s. Indeed “The League” even formed their own match team who were recorded competing in post 2nd World War 1st Division National Matches.

Please click on these two documents below to see them in full size and have a read of what was decided upon one November evening in 1908

Minutes of the first meeting of the Freshwater Fish Preservation League

Minutes of the first meeting of the Freshwater Fish Preservation League

 

Hand Written Minutes Of The First Meeting Of The Freshwater Fish Preservation League

Hand Written Minutes Of The First Meeting Of The Freshwater Fish Preservation League

Over course of the next few weeks we will be adding more documents to our archive – and will create more links to documents and information about this organisation

The Angler Magazine 1948 Fish Prints

Stashed away in an old faded manila envelope we found these amazing fish prints – they are the complete set that was given away in “The Angler” magazine in 1948.

Pike - The Angler Magazine 1948

Pike – The Angler Magazine 1948

Ruffe And Miller's Thumb - The Angler 1948

Ruffe And Miller’s Thumb – The Angler 1948

Sharp Nosed Eel, Broad Nosed Eel - The Angler Magazine 1948

Sharp Nosed Eel, Broad Nosed Eel – The Angler Magazine 1948

Chub - The Angler Magazine 1948

Chub – The Angler Magazine 1948

Carp - The Angler Magazine 1948

Carp – The Angler Magazine 1948

Rainbow Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Rainbow Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Loch Leven Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Loch Leven Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Great Lake Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Great Lake Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Gillaroo Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Gillaroo Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Gudgeon and Barbel - The Angler Magazine 1948

Gudgeon and Barbel – The Angler Magazine 1948

Graining and Dace - The Angler Magazine 1948

Graining and Dace – The Angler Magazine 1948

Galway Sea Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Galway Sea Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Black Finned Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Black Finned Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Salmon Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Salmon Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Golden Tench - The Angler Magazine 1948

Golden Tench – The Angler Magazine 1948

Sturgeon - The Angler Magazine 1948

Sturgeon – The Angler Magazine 1948

Short Headed Salmon and Silver Headed Salmon - The Angler Magazine 1948

Short Headed Salmon and Silver Headed Salmon – The Angler Magazine 1948

Salmon male - The Angler Magazine 1948

Salmon male – The Angler Magazine 1948

Grilse or young Salmon - The Angler Magazine 1948

Grilse or young Salmon – The Angler Magazine 1948

Lamprey and Lampern - The Angler Magazine 1948

Lamprey and Lampern – The Angler Magazine 1948

Pollan and Powan - The Angler Magazine 1948

Pollan and Powan – The Angler Magazine 1948

Pomeranian Bream and White Bream - The Angler Magazine 1948

Pomeranian Bream and White Bream – The Angler Magazine 1948

Golden and Bronze Carp - The Angler Magazine 1948

Golden and Bronze Carp – The Angler Magazine 1948

Azurine, Double, Rudd - The Angler Magazine 1948

Azurine, Double, Rudd – The Angler Magazine 1948

Vendace, Gwyniad, Grayling - The Angler Magazine 1948

Vendace, Gwyniad, Grayling – The Angler Magazine 1948

Spined Loach, Minnow, Loach, Bleak - The Angler Magazine 1948

Spined Loach, Minnow, Loach, Bleak – The Angler Magazine 1948

Grey's Charr , Cole's Charr, Alpine Charr - The Angler Magazine 1948

Grey’s Charr , Cole’s Charr, Alpine Charr – The Angler Magazine 1948

Sticklebacks - The Angler Magazine 1948

Sticklebacks – The Angler Magazine 1948

Crucian Carp, Prussian Carp - The Angler Magazine 1948

Crucian Carp, Prussian Carp – The Angler Magazine 1948

Torgoch and Alpine Charr - The Angler Magazine 1948

Torgoch and Alpine Charr – The Angler Magazine 1948

Loch Killen Charr - The Angler Magazine 1948

Loch Killen Charr – The Angler Magazine 1948

Roach - The Angler Magazine 1948

Roach – The Angler Magazine 1948

salmon trout var - The Angler Magazine 1948

salmon trout var – The Angler Magazine 1948

Bull Trout - The Angler Magazine 1948

Bull Trout – The Angler Magazine 1948

Tench - The Angler Magazine 1948

Tench – The Angler Magazine 1948

Burbot - The Angler Magazine 1948

Burbot – The Angler Magazine 1948

Common Bream - The Angler Magazine 1948

Common Bream – The Angler Magazine 1948

 

Manchester Monsters Of The Deep

Looking at old photos of the canal in the city centre of Manchester, the industry, the grime, the sheer Dickensian background,  you’d never think that it would have the potential to produce the fish of a lifetime for a local angler -a  huge beautiful leviathan of the aquatic world, a 5 foot long sleek powerful predator – the apex predator of the waterways.

Old Castlefield Dukes

Indeed – when sections of our local canals get drained down to allow for repairs to take place, you’d scarcely believe that anything could live among the filth and debris that us humans throw into their murky waters.

Dirty Manchester Canal

Despite its outwardly looking murky grey appearance, the shopping trollies, traffic cones, chairs, bikes and umbrellas, the source of the waters for our local canals comes from high up on the hills and moors above Littleborough and Saddleworth – and is some of the cleanest water in the country. Untainted by the pollution of our cities, industries and the poor agricultural practices of our nations farmers – it flows like a clean bright ribbon through the centre of our city.

Anglers have known this for years, and are aware that our local canals, the Rochdale, the Ashton , and the Bridgewater are fantastic fisheries, stuffed with species of fish such as Roach, Perch, Rudd, Tench, Bream, Gudgeon and Carp…. an angling mecca.

These clean water corridors also act as nature superhighways through our suburbs and city centres.  They’re  ribbons of high quality habitat allowing nature such as Kingfishers, Otters, Herons, Water Voles and Dippers to make their homes and thrive in the most unlikely urban locations.

At the top of the food chain in this watery sometimes murky ecosystem is a super apex predator Esox Lucius – commonly known as the Pike.

Huge numbers of small jack pike live in our canals – in many areas comprising over 10% of the canals biomass.

Rarely exceeding a couple of feet in length they are greedy customers for anglers worms and lures its not too difficult to catch up to a dozen in an afternoons fishing if you know what your about and the conditions are right… However catching the bigger, wiser older Pike who prey on the jack pike is an altogether different task.

Huge, cunning old pike can grow up to 5 feet long and reach nearly 50lbs in weight. Our local canals in Greater Manchester have been known to produce the very occasional exceptional Pike of up to 30lbs

A 20lb Pike from a Greater Manchester canal is a real specimen,,,, the fish of a lifetime. The vast majority of our regions thousands of anglers have never seen a 20lb pike let alone caught one.

One or two might be lucky or sufficiently skilled to tempt one of these huge underwater leviathans – most probably from a larger river or lake where the Pike have the space to grow large… but catching one from a canal is the challenge of a lifetime, and a serious undertaking in terms of time and planning.

Catching two of these supersized fish is a special achievement – something that garners the respects of your angling peers.

Catching three is something most anglers could ever dream about..

But catching four – then you quite rightly achieve an inconic status and are revered, acclaimed and envied by anglers on a national basis.

This leads us to young Kaden McCarthy – a 14 year old boy from an inner city estate in Salford.

Kaden sent me this photo today – of yet another remarkable pike he has caught in the canal that runs through city centre Manchester.

Kaden Fish Of The Year 2017 v1

A fantastic specimen fish – the Pike of a lifetime for mere mortal anglers.

However young Kaden has developed into a special angler, with ability and instinct far beyond his 14 years.

He has a developed a special aptitude for catching big fish from Manchester waterways.

Heres a picture (below) of another monster Pike he caught last year in Manchester City Centre – which gave him the accolade of being the youngest angler to win the prestigious Salford Friendly Anglers “Fish Of The Year” award in 2016.

Kaden Fish Of The Year 2016

And then sandwiched between the capture of these two huge pike – he has managed to catch two more – taking his total of 20lb+ pike  to the mystical 4 – A remarkable achievement for someone so young.

Kaden Pike YMCA Kaden Key103

 

But the story regarding this young anglers abilities is still far from completely told…..

In addition to the capture of these amazing Pike,,,, young Kaden is proving himself to be an all round angler – catching great fish of all species…

Like this bream, again a great fish from an urban canal, and this carp from the River Irwell.

Kaden Bream Kaden Carp

The exploits of this excellent young fisherman are now coming to be recognised on a national basis,,,,, a firm friendship has developed between Kaden and local fishing legend Ant Glascoe Jnr…….. and the UKs most famous angler Matt Hayes name checks Kaden on his Facebook posts on a regular basis…

I think we can confidently say – A Star Is Born – he comes from the Salford Friendly – and we are all very proud that he’s one of us.

 

Restocking The Old River

Over the last 18 months we have been making a big effort to improve the fishing on the Old River Irwell in Irlam.

In addition to renovating/replacing most of the pegs – we have been hunting down grants and other sources of funding to spend on fish.

Our original restocking during 2013/14/15 saw us stocking nearly 4500 bream, 1000 rudd, 1800 roach and 500 fingerling tench.

This seemed to make little to zero impression on catch returns – as they were a mere drop in the ocean in comparison to the area of the lake.

Fast forwards to spring 2016 and a fantasticly generous grant from The Hamilton Davies Trust saw us changing our restocking policy and instead of stocking large numbers of small fish, we decided to go for lower numbers of bigger (more expensive) fish. So using the grant from HDT we bought 350 x 1lb tench.

Cracking new tench for the Old River Irwell in Irlam

Cracking new tench for the Old River Irwell in Irlam

It took 10 trips with the bin to and from the pick up truck - great to see so many big fish being stocked

It took 10 trips with the bin to and from the pick up truck – great to see so many big fish being stocked

We then spent the rest of the year improving pegs and building access steps.

This winter, we have stocked 75 2lb+ common and mirror carp – see video below

And then followed this up with another 15o tench between 10 inches and 2lb see videos below

At long last – anglers are now beginning to enjoy great sport again on the Old River – go down give it a try and then tell us how you get on.

Update On Recent Reported Pollution Incidents

We have a long, and ever growing dialogue with the Environment Agency regarding the large number of pollution incidents which take place on the River Irwell system…

In addition to this dialogue with the EA about incidents… we are also in regular contact about the long standing poor (but improving) chemical content of the water…… and the frequency and volume of legal discharges of raw untreated sewage from our local utility company

Here is an update on some of the recent pollution events.

Crown Oil, 10,000+ litres of heating oil allowed to escape into River Roch – – a 2012 Category 2 (significant) incident resulted in the company receiving a formal caution. A 2014 incident was attended but not substantiated

Briggs Demolition – long term effects of poor enforcement? (Diffuse pollution from illegal landfill site, already prosecuted by the EA and let off by courts with reduced fine to enable environmental clean up which has never taken place. Ongoing pollution from this site results in massively depleted kick sample results downstream of this point.) Our enforcement was completed several years ago. This is now a contaminated land site for which queries should be addressed to the local authority   – a further update on this site is that UU are considering remediation works to enable access to their sewer network – this has to be good news

 Bradshaw Brook 2013 UU contractor HCL acid – hundreds of fish deaths - Prosecution complete nearly £1m in fines https://www.gov.uk/government/news/united-utilities-and-contractors-fined-almost-1m-for-polluting-brook-with-corrosive-bleach

Warth Fold Hydro – built without a fish pass! – regularly breaches abstraction consents by running all the river flow through its turbine and sometimes taking more flow than the river has, thus depleting pool above, then drying out river below while the pool above the weir refills. Also EA have allowed the hydro operator to but batons on top of the weir to increase the head of the retained pool of water above the weir, and direct more flow through the turbine!!! How can any of this be legal? – No response from the EA – update 2017 The EA cannot enforce a fish pass be constructed on these dreadful schemes (example Bury Community Hydro)  

Ringley Waste Water Treatment Works  split main 1 2013–massive amount of eaw sewage entered the watercourse during low flow dry period….. category 2 (significant) incident United Utilities accepted a formal caution

Ringley Waste Water Treatment Works / Rhodes Farm split sludge pipe 2 2013 same area – different pipe – (a second low pressure pipe rupture under the River Irwell – Category 3 (minor) incident warning letter

Bury Waste Water Treatment Works –  no screening on inlet (EA no comment – UU’s comment was that they don’t need one because the EA have never asked them to put one in) Assessment of the impact of this is ongoing in order to establish what improvements if any are required under forthcoming AMP schemes – SFAS will be asking for this practice to be reviewed in the next round of United Utilties Asset Management Planing 6

Fly Tipping in Bury and Radcliffe – using river banks as landfill – plus other industrial related fly tipping (neither EA nor Council take any responsibility) Not an EA Matter – Matter for Bury Council
 April 2014 Irwell turns green – then white – no feedback – no prosecution of building site (EA claim no knowledge of this incident despite EA and UU responding) Polluter not identified no further action
April 2014 Wince Brook (EA investigated and found no evidence of pollution despite photographs from anglers showing source of pollution and the river running milky white) Polluter not identified no further action
July 2014 Tesco Haslingden 10,000 litres fuel (no comment – ongoing criminal investigation) Guilty pleas entered sentencing due summer 2017
Dec 2014 Irwell turns white (again) – anglers locate source of pollution to Rakem Chemicals - Category 2 incident (significant but discoloration only – effectively a white dye) formal caution accepted by Rakem Ltd 
SFAS have asked angling club members to report the worst/most foul sewage overflows – we have then taken this information forwards to UU and to the EA and asked for these locations to be investigated and prioritised..
We are very glad to report to members that our views and observations are both listened to and acted upon.
Some of the worst performing pipes are cleaned immediately… others are noted as being “in need of improvement”
We are pleased to inform you that the sewage overflows at Nuttall Park in Bury, Moses Gate in Bolton, Bury Bridge and Elton in Bury are now high on the list for remediation in the next round of capital spending from UU….. there are many more locations where the sewage system is going to upgraded which will improve the water quality of our rivers……… many many thanks to our members for highlighting the grot spots so that we have make those responsible aware,, and to encourage action…
Well done to all our members …. please keep the reports and photos coming in…
Shit pipe 004 irwell pollution 1
Irwell pollution againirk orange

Salford Friendly Anglers Rules 1904

These rules printed in 1904 reflect the fact that Salford Friendly Anglers Society had dropped the financial side of their activities after the banking crisis of the 1890s.

The club continues to run to very simple set rules to this day – we prefer anglers to enjoy fishing in their own style – to use common sense and not be hamstrung by a huge list of pre-determined does and don’ts.

Salford Friendly Anglers Society Rules 1904

Salford Friendly Anglers Society Rules 1904